Strutt & Parker donates defibrillator to local centre

The Banchory office of Strutt & Parker has donated a defibrillator to a busy Deeside community facility.

The defibrillator, an emergency medical device which administers high energy electric shocks to someone in cardiac arrest, is to be located at Woodend Barn in the heart of the Woodend Community Complex on the outskirts of Banchory.

The Banchory office decided to donate the medical apparatus as part of the firm’s charity funding for the year. The defibrillator will be available to all the users of Woodend, which include Banchory Christian Fellowship, Buchanans Cafe Bistro, Woodend Barn Community Arts Centre, the Allotments and Deeside Rugby Club, of which Strutt & Parker are sponsors.

David Smart, Partner in Strutt & Parker’s Banchory office, said: “We have long been associated with the Sandpiper Trust, a charity working to improve rural emergency medical care, of which one of the founders was former Strutt & Parker (Scotland) chairman Robin Maitland.

“We felt funding a defibrillator fitted in well alongside the Sandpiper Trust as it is all about improving emergency medical help in rural areas. We felt it was appropriate to locate it in the Woodend complex as it has a high footfall and is visited by a wide demographic. It is a sensible location in which to have a defibrillator and we are delighted to be able to provide this facility for the community.”

The defibrillator was presented to Woodend landlord and Aberdeenshire West MSP Alexander Burnett at an event attended by representatives from the various community groups which use Woodend at 3pm on Wednesday August 3; with training and familiarisation taking place throughout the afternoon.

 

The Queen presents milestone Sandpiper bag on behalf of life-saving charity

Thursday 4th July 2016, Balmoral,Aberdeenshire Scotland. Sandpiper Trust donate a defibrillator to her Majesty the Queen at Balmoral (Photo: Ross Johnston/Newsline Media)

Her Majesty the Queen today, (Thurs 4 August) presented the 1000th Sandpiper Bag to a remote community on behalf of the Sandpiper Trust.

The Sandpiper Trust aims to save lives in rural Scotland by equipping trained, volunteer responders with Sandpiper bags which contain all the necessary equipment required in an emergency. Working with the Scottish Ambulance Service, Sandpiper responders are often the first to arrive at the scene of an emergency.

The small charity was set up by the family of Sandy Dickson, who died in a tragic accident when he was 14 years old. Since then, it has been instrumental in saving countless lives across some of the most remote areas throughout Scotland. The handover of its 1000th Sandpiper bag marks 15 years of funding and distributing Sandpiper bags to GP’s, nurses and paramedics. Each bag comes at a cost of £1,000 but is priceless to the families of those saved by a Sandpiper responder.

Supported by the Scottish Ambulance and Fire Service, the charity is very much an extension of the emergency services. Its work also wouldn’t be possible without support from BASICS-Scotland’s Dr. Colville Laird and Dr. Ewen McLeod, the charity’s medical advisers. An independent charity responsible for the provision of emergency training programs for doctors, paramedics and nurses, they are also responsible for the concept and development of the Sandpiper bag.

Speaking of Thursday’s presentation, which took place at Balmoral, Sandpiper Trustee, Claire Maitland MBE commented “I am immensely proud and extremely honoured that Her Majesty, who has been supportive of our small charity since it was founded in 2001, agreed to present the 1000th Sandpiper Bag on behalf of The Sandpiper Trust.

“The Queen has long been familiar with the importance of the work that Sandpiper does to support pre hospital care in rural communities throughout Scotland.

Claire continued “Accidents happen and it is vitally important that responders armed with the correct skills and equipped with the necessary emergency medical equipment can be alerted to medical emergencies or sudden illnesses in the quickest possible time. With 1000 bags now in the hands of local community volunteers, we have the best chance of beating the clock and saving lives which otherwise might have been lost. Our work would not be possible without our volunteers and fundraisers and so today we also celebrate with them.”

Her Majesty presented the 1000th bag to Dr Colville Laird, Clinical Director of BASICS – Scotland for delivery to Dr Jennifer Leigh, Kyles Medical Centre, Tighnabruaich.

The Sandpiper Trust has recently launched its biggest fundraising campaign to date. Sandpiper Wildcat will focus specifically on improving cardiac arrest outcomes in Grampian and aims to save 50 lives every year throughout the north-east by equipping volunteer responders with defibrillators.

Claire Maitland commented “In an emergency every second counts but with the chances of survival reducing by 10% every minute after a cardiac arrest, it’s vital that emergency care be administered quickly. In support of our Wildcat campaign, the Trust was delighted to have the opportunity to also present a defibrillator to the Balmoral Estate, which will be positioned in The Glenmuick Visitor Centre.”

Thursday, marked another more personal milestone for the Maitland family. In addition to Co-Founders Alistair & Penny Dickson, Claire’s husband Robin Maitland was also in attendance. Having taken ill in December 2014, Robin has been unable to return home and was accompanied by a nurse from Glen O’Dee Hospital where he is currently being cared for. His presence made the event that more momentous.

Gavin Hastings, OBE & Patron of the Trust stated “It was a privilege to attend the presentation and to celebrate with a family who have turned their own tragedy into such a positive vision.

Talking of his role he said “The greatest satisfaction to me is when I hear reports back from doctors of the lives that have been saved as a direct result of the Sandpiper equipment that they have been given. Today we are celebrating a major milestone, but tomorrow the works continues because, with community support, there are always more lives to save.”

Job Vacancy – Sandpiper Trust Administrator

Wildcat - re-starting hearts in Grampian

The Sandpiper Trust is currently looking for an Administrator to be based in the BASICS Scotland office in Aberuthven.

The post holder will have responsibility for administration of the Sandpiper Wildcat Project & administrative support to The Sandpiper Trust.

Responsible to: Project Manager, Sandpiper Wildcat Project

Hours: 35 hours per week

Based at: BASICS Scotland, Sandpiper House, Aberuthven Enterprise Park, Aberuthven, Perth & Kinross, PH3 1EL

Salary: Band 3 – £16.960 – £19,927 per annum

Fixed Term Contract – 2 Years

Main duties will include:

  • Provide administrative support to the Sandpiper Wildcat Project Manager and Paramedic trainers – co-ordinating all travel/accommodation bookings, collation of information & maintaining accurate records
  • Organising training sessions for volunteer responders including booking venues, liaising with Paramedic Trainers, communicating with volunteers and maintaining accurate records of training delivered.
  • Ordering equipment required for the Wildcat Project and maintaining accurate records of distribution.
  • Minute taking at Sandpiper meetings.
  • Printing and distribution of marketing materials including posters, flyers & brochures.
  • Accounts – manage donor information, banking cheques & cash, gift aid reclaims.
  • Fundraising support – events, online shop, distribution of collection cans and merchandise.
  • First point of contact for the Sandpiper Trust – email and telephone queries, opening mail.
  • Assist in all aspects of The Sandpiper Trust’s work undertaking other reasonable duties as required.

 

Download full job description here

Download person specification form here

 

Applications should be made in the first instance by emailing your C.V. to Keri Fickling at admin@sandpiperwildcat.co.uk

Alternatively you can post your C.V. to – The Sandpiper Trust, Sandpiper House, Aberuthven Enterprise Park, Aberuthven, Perth & Kinross, PH3 1EL

Two Western Riders take to the Great Glen in aid of Sandpiper Trust

Western riders, Sandra and Iain Loder from Aberdeenshire will be riding their horses along the Great Glen Way this August, from Fort William to Inverness in aid of the Sandpiper Trust . Iain (aged 13) and his Mum will be riding unaided for the 70 miles, which should take 5 days. All essential kit, including tent, sleeping bags, food, waterproofs!! and lots of midge spray!! will be carried on the horses. Iain will be riding an American Quarter Horse cross Appaloosa gelding called ‘Lucky’ and  Sandra is on her homebred Quarter Horse mare called ‘Chilli’. Sandra is a Western Equestrian Society approved instructor and backs and trains horses but both her and Iain are more used to showing their horses in the arena, not hitting the real outback trail, so this is a first for both and real expedition. They have had some trial runs, checking out the kit and making sure they carry only what is necessary to minimise the weight for the horses. Lets hope the weather is kind!

Look out for their just giving site, they need your support.

Robin Maitland

Robin Maitland, husband of Claire Maitland, trustee of The Sandpiper Trust and father to Harry, Cara, Anna and Jack has spent the last 6 months in hospital in a critical condition.  Our trustees meeting are not the same and we  hope that he will shortly be back in the re-hab unit in Aberdeen where we will be able to hold our trustees meetings in future.

The Maitland family feature massively in many of the early photos of Sandpiper bag presentations.  They took part in the very first Sandpiper Trust Fundraiser at the  6k run at Balmoral back in 2001.  They are all a huge part of this Sandpiper journey.  Robin’s wife Claire has been at the forefront of the charity and compiled both the “Cookery Book” and “The Swallow , The Owl and The Sandpiper”.  I would therefore think that it is safe to say that Robin has  tasted recipes and listen to prose and poems for a good few years, quietly giving advise when asked, supporting his wife, with her relentless enthusiasm for the charity but also being very much part of it all.

He is  thoughtful, funny and intelligent and we would like him to  be back very soon.

Aly & Penny

 

Angie Steer at Inverness Pilot Scheme presentation

DSC05885 DSC05884

 

Angie Steer with family of Elsie McPherson, attends presentation at Raigmore  for the Inverness Truama Pilot Scheme led by Dr Luke Regan and part funded by The Sandpiper Trust.

The Inverness Trauma Pilot Project

part of equipment presentation to Inverness Trauma Pilot Scheme

part of equipment presentation to Inverness Trauma Pilot Scheme

DSC05894Aly and Penny Dickson were  pleased to attend a presentation event for the Inverness Trauma Pilot Project.

Angie Steer and friends and family also attended as they had raised funds for The Sandpiper Trust in memory of their friend Elsie McPherson.

Dr Luke Regan , who is heading this project , gave us a summary of the progress of the scheme and also introduced us to  Mr Michael Gale – General Surgeon, Andrew MacDonald – Emergency Nurse and Offshore Rig Medic and  Dr Claire Vincent – Acute Medicine Consultant. These three along with others will be part of the Pilot Scheme, equipped with Sandpiper bags, defibrillators and communications devices which will link them to the Emergency call Centre in Inverness. They will be responding on a voluntary bases. 

Deborah Jones the Chief Operating Officer for NHS Highland was also in attendance.  NHS Highland have been instrumental in part funding and encouraging  this project.  The Sandpiper Trust are extremely grateful to them.

We look forward to hearing how the project progresses and wish them all the success.

 

 

 

 

 

8th August 2015 – The Lanrick Challenge -” Embrace it, Survive it.”

www.lanrickchallenge.com  to enter this exhilarating, 6 or 12 K. Obstacle Mud Run.  Not to be missed, sign up today.

Bittersweet Marathon runner raises funds

A great friend of Sandy Dickson’s, Tom Birkbeck, took to the streets of London in an ambitious bid to  complete the race despite sustaining a painful knee injury.   His efforts were not in vain.  He raised an incredible £6344.26  although he was unable to complete the  marathon.  We are extremely grateful to Tom and his supporters.  We know how gruelling marathon running can be and also how important supporters are. Thank you Tom for your continued support of The Sandpiper Trust and thank you to all those who sponsored you.

We hope your injury is on the mend.

Graeme Ramage visits Isle of Coll

The Sandpiper Trust supported the  community resilence project on Coll by part funding their defibrillators and sending Graeme on a two day visit to the island.

From the 7th to the 9th of April this year I had the pleasure of visiting the Island of Coll to help with their community resilience scheme and provide some resuscitation workshops for the island population.

 

Hosted by the local GP Dr Celine O’Neil and a local farmer Rob Wainright, I set up camp in the village community centre An Cridhe with an array of resuscitation manikins and practice defibrillators.

The plan on Coll is to have a number of defibrillators spread throughout the Island accessible to all .

They have at present a number of defibrillators on the Island including one in the Islands ambulance, The Doctor carries one in her car, The Island resident nurse has one, The Airport have a defibrillator plus the local fire station/ fire tender has one on board. In addition I took 2 with me purchased by a fund raising effort and a partnership with The Sandpiper Trust.

 

I arranged to have open access to anyone and everyone on the Island for the time I was there and arranged trips out to provide bespoke ‘on site’ training to a couple of locations for the Project Trust group.

As usual with such events when word of mouth got around the numbers of people grew over the time I was there. Attendee’s included Farmers, Ferry Port workers, retained Fire Crew, Dustman, Hotel Staff, Project Trust Staff, The community Centre staff and their management, fishermen, postman and general members of the public who arrived throughout my time there.

 

They were treated to a demonstration of safe approach, recognising cardiac arrest, how to get help, and commencement of chest compression CPR. I then moved on to explain a wee bit about the defib, the location of the defibs and a demonstration of how it works.

 

The rescuer was then invited to start assessing a sudden collapsed adult patient, call for help and request a defibrillator and commence chest compressions whilst the defib was brought. After a few minutes of compressions either I or another rescuer would take over compressions whilst the first rescuer took over defib duties. And so a round Robin began of CPR and Defib until I was satisfied people had had an opportunity to have a go at the elements described. CPR was observed and recorded by the use of the Q-CPR system displaying a percentage of correct compressions including rate, depth of compressions and recoil of the chest.

 

Dr O’neil attended along with her nurse and at different times the Health Care Support Worker and the GP practice receptionist. Celine seemed happy that we reached everyone we could despite the lambing, fog in Oban meaning a reduced Ferry service, breast screening off Island and an exodus by aircraft because of ferry problems to Oban.